National Infrastructure services

Summary of National Infrastructure PlanThe South African Government adopted a National Infrastructure Plan in 2012 that intends to transform our economic landscape while simultaneously creating significant numbers of new jobs, and to strengthen the delivery of basic services. The plan also supports the integration of African economies.

Government will over the three years from 2013/14 invest
R827 billion in the building of new and the upgrading of existing infrastructure, Minister of Finanace Pravin Gordhan announced in his 2013 Budget Speech.

damThese investments will improve access by South Africans to healthcare facilities, schools, water, sanitation, housing and electrification. On the other hand, investment in the construction of ports, roads, railway systems, electricity plants, hospitals, schools and dams will contribute to faster economic growth. The biggest chunk of the investment in infrastructure will continue to come from Eskom which will invest R205.1 billion over the next three years. Eskom's new power stations, Medupi and Kusile, are expected to start producing electricity in 2014 and 2015 respectively.

Challenges

18 years into our democracy, there are still major challenges of poverty, unemployment and inequality.

The New Growth Path sets a goal of five million new jobs by 2020, identifies structural problems in the economy to be overcome and points to opportunities in specific sectors and markets or "jobs drivers". The first jobs driver is infrastructure: laying the basis for higher growth, inclusivity and job creation.

Response

Mandela BridgeIn order to address these challenges and goals, Cabinet established the Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Committee (PICC), to:

  • coordinate, integrate and accelerate implementation
  • develop a single common National Infrastructure Plan that will be monitored and centrally driven
  • identify who is responsible and hold them to account
  • develop a 20-year planning framework beyond one administration to avoid a stop-start pattern to the infrastucture roll-out.

Under their guidance, 18 strategic integrated projects (SIPS) have been developed.

Achievements in 2012

By January 2013, work had commenced on all 18 SIPs. By the end of March 2013, government will have spent about R860 billion rand on infrastructure development since 2009.


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Q&A

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Why is infrastructure development important to developing nations?

Without well-planned infrastructure, the basic needs in society aren't met. Populations need planning and management of transportation, water, city development, and communications in order to succeed. All these factors work together to create a nation able to support it's population.

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What is national infrastructure?

(DOD, NATO) Infrastructure provided and financed by a NATO member in its own territory solely for its own forces (including those forces assigned to or designated for NATO). See also infrastructure.